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October 17, 2020

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The first person to have seen the actual, never-before-seen footage of the Apollo 11 lunar module re-entering Earth’s atmosphere in 1972 was the astronaut who filmed it before his return, the Astronaut Reconnaissance Orbiter (ARO).

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On July 17 of that year, the ARO snapped the footage on the Moon near the “Lunar Lake” – an area of high volcanic activity in the highlander plateau west of the summit in the south polar region, about 3.6° South from the location where the two astronauts on the Lunar Module Eagle were stationed: Neil Armstrong and Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin.

The footage shows the astronauts exiting the lunar module on their third leg. As they hit top of the crater lake, a thick cloud of volcanic gases reaches the Moon’s surface, enveloping everything that was below them.

From Earth’s perspective inside the crater lake, a cloud of red dust rises up from the crater floor to form a deep trench. In the foreground of the frame it is possible to see what has to be the lunar module re-entering Earth’s atmosphere.

To have seen the footage, Aldrin needed to jump into the lunar module first (or close enough – he could have been shot from a different point) and then to jump off. This could only have been accomplished in the late 1970s or early 1980s, when the ARO operated.

Before the re-entry of Apollo 11, this part of the footage had never been obtained. As a result, no other footage exists of the actual event. In April 2001, one of the ARO’s cameras caught a shot of the lunar module exiting Earth’s atmosphere from a distance of less than 1,500 meters.

The next step was for the newly-established National Geographic organization to acquire the footage. However, they declined a $600,000 offer to fund further development of the ARO and the mission in general – because the company didn’t have the personnel and resources necessary to produce the video.

“National Geographic is proud of our

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